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The University Star




The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

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Texas State needs a culinary arts department

Texas+State+needs+a+culinary+arts+department
Adriana Villanueva

Texas State boasts a rich list of brilliant academic programs, but one missing ingredient is a culinary arts major.

A culinary arts department at Texas State would help many aspiring chefs find success. Students would gain a strong foundation in culinary techniques, food science and kitchen management, preparing them for rewarding careers in restaurants, hotels or even their own food businesses.

Adding a culinary arts program wouldn’t just diversify the school’s curriculum; it would ignite a wave of benefits for both students and the university, from attracting food enthusiast students and unlocking lucrative career opportunities to strengthening community ties.

A culinary arts program at Texas State would attract an entirely new wave of students passionate about food and creativity.

Several Texas colleges offer culinary degrees, including Texas Women’s UniversityAlvin Community College and St. Phillips College, providing comprehensive education and training for aspiring chefs.

St. Phillips College in San Antonio is renowned for its culinary arts program. Students at St. Phillips gain expertise in various culinary techniques, kitchen management and hospitality principles, preparing them for successful careers in the culinary industry.

These established culinary arts programs could serve as valuable models as Texas State does not currently offer a culinary arts major. Once established, a culinary department at Texas State could also benefit from partnering with established programs such as the ones at St. Phillips.

This influx would enrich campus life and generate additional opportunities for foodie-focused events and workshops, giving students the first step into the culinary industry.

The culinary industry provides millions of jobs nationwide. According to the National Restaurant Association, in 2020, there were 15.1 million restaurant employees in the U.S., with 10% of the overall U.S. workforce in the restaurant industry. A culinary arts major would equip students with a degree to find success in this lucrative field.

With that in mind, Texas State has the potential to offer an esteemed culinary arts major, and there are already a few minors that could complement the major itself.

Minors in business administration, recreation studies and nutrition could complement a culinary arts major and foster collaboration between departments, leading to innovative projects and research opportunities. The major could also fall under the School of Family & Consumer Science, as the school offers a nutrition and food science minor.

Texas State’s location could also allow culinary arts majors to foster partnerships with local businesses.

Restaurants could benefit from a pool of well-trained interns while students gain valuable hands-on experience in the food industry. This collaboration would strengthen ties between Texas State and the San Marcos community, creating a win-win for both parties.

The impact wouldn’t stop there. A culinary arts major could become a catalyst for the local economy. Graduates could open new restaurants, catering businesses or food trucks, bringing fresh entrepreneurial spirit into the community. This economic ripple effect will benefit San Marcos and the surrounding areas.

Adding a culinary arts major to Texas State is a recipe for success. It will empower students, enrich the community and foster a vibrant food culture in San Marcos.

-Adriana Villanueva is a communication design freshman

The University Star welcomes Letters to the Editor from its readers. All submissions are reviewed and considered by the Editor in Chief and Opinions Editor for publication. Not all letters are guaranteed for publication.

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