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The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star




The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

Fishy Business: A.E. Wood Fish Hatchery undergoes busiest time of year

Michael+Matthews%2C+the+manager+of+the+A.E.+Wood+Fish+Hatchery%2C+analyzes+sunshine+bass+embryo+and+fry+under+a+microscope%2C+Thursday%2C+March+12%2C+2020%2C+at+the+A.E.+Wood+Fish+Hatchery.+A+fry+is+a+newly+hatched+fish+egg%2C+and+samples+contain+both+embryo+and+fry.+He+checks+each+individual+for+deformities+and+overall+health+to+record+on+a+data+sheet.

Michael Matthews, the manager of the A.E. Wood Fish Hatchery, analyzes sunshine bass embryo and fry under a microscope, Thursday, March 12, 2020, at the A.E. Wood Fish Hatchery. A fry is a newly hatched fish egg, and samples contain both embryo and fry. He checks each individual for deformities and overall health to record on a data sheet.

Less than a mile off IH-35 stands an agricultural establishment pivotal to Texas waters and wildlife. Built in 1949, A.E. Wood Fish Hatchery is responsible for spawning, hatching and raising numerous species of freshwater fish to upkeep its population within state waters.
The hatchery is one of five freshwater facilities, along with three saltwater hatcheries, responsible for stocking Texas waters. Without these hatcheries, fish populations would be unable to maintain a healthy population level, ecosystems would become unbalanced and the economic business of game fishing would not exist.
In this video, manager of the A.E. Wood Fish Hatchery explains the processes of spawning and raising fish as well as the role the hatchery plays for Texas wildlife.

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