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The University Star




The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Hays County rise to 16

Hays+County+Epidemiologist+Eric+Schneider+speaks+about+the+first+presumptive+positive+case+of+COVID-19+in+the+county%2C+Sunday%2C+March+15%2C+2020%2C+at+the+Hays+County+Historic+Courthouse.+%26%238220%3BThere+is+no+magic+cure+for+COVID-19%2C%26%238221%3B+Schneider+said.+%26%238220%3BThe+majority+of+people+let+it+run+its+course+and+go+back+to+%28their%29+everyday+life.%26%238221%3B

Hays County Epidemiologist Eric Schneider speaks about the first presumptive positive case of COVID-19 in the county, Sunday, March 15, 2020, at the Hays County Historic Courthouse. “There is no magic cure for COVID-19,” Schneider said. “The majority of people let it run its course and go back to (their) everyday life.”

The Hays County Local Health Department confirmed three new cases of COVID-19, raising the total cases in Hays County to 16 on Sunday, March 29.
Fifteen of the positive COVID-19 cases have affected adults between the ages of 20 and 59. Only one female adult between the ages of 60 and 69 has been affected, according to a press release from the county.
As of March 29, four of the cases are travel related and 12 of the lab-confirmed cases have not reported any travel. Hays County has nine pending cases, six recovered cases, 10 active cases and 170 negative cases. There has been a total of three hospitalizations with two being current.
Hays County Epidemiologist Eric Schneider said symptoms for COVID-19 include low to moderate fever, a cough and congestion. These symptoms are usually treated with over-the-counter medications.
Individuals who suffer from these symptoms should self-quarantine until they are fever-free for 72 hours without the help of fever-reducing medication.
According to Schneider, most individuals who contract the disease will not need to seek medical care.
“Residents with underlying medical conditions or a weakened immune system and persons over 65 tend to be hardest hit by COVID-19 and should consult their health care provider if they are experiencing symptoms,” Schneider said.
Individuals concerned about possible exposure to COVID-19 are encouraged to contact their healthcare provider or the Hays County Local Health Department at 512.393.5520. For additional information about COVID-19, visit the Texas Department of State Health Services or the Centers for Disease Control website.
The University Star’s COVID-19 coverage can be found here.

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