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The University Star




The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

Commissioners Court adopts a National Crime Stopper month proclamation, discusses amending human resources policy

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Star file photo

At its Jan. 16 meeting, Hays County Commissioners Court opened the floor to adopting a proclamation declaring January 2024 as National Crime Stoppers Month and discussed possible action to amend the human resources policy.

“The Crime Stopper program has empowered the citizens of this county… Hays County Crime Stoppers are working to increase awareness,” Precinct 2 Commissioner, Michelle Cohen, said.

According to the proclamation, Hays County Crime Stoppers have received over 6,700 tips since 1981.

By labeling the month, Hays County hopes to increase public involvement in regard to leaving tips for crimes and other acts that improve public safety.

The Crime Stopper program is the largest and most widely used tips organization in the United States. They provide education on crime prevention, accept tips and encourage people to stand up against crime.

The court also discussed possible action to amend the human resources policy. Following the comments of Shari Miller, human resources director of Hays County, the court decided to approve her suggestions and changes.

According to the fifteen step plan discussed in February 2023, promotions that move a worker’s step drastically could result in very high pay raises. In order to reduce the amount of pay raises, Miller proposes that if a worker moves up three steps, 15% is the maximum pay raise they could potentially earn.

“If you are promoting more than three grades, this is where the calculation would need to come in from the payroll office, you would land at the step that is the next highest and do a 15% increase,” Miller said. “So employees could experience greater than 15% increase in pay, but they do have to land on a specific salary assigned to the step.”

The court discussed several options for salary adjustments for demotions but ultimately came the decision that it would be on a case-by-case basis.

In regard to demotions that are not at the fault of the individual being demoted, Judge Ruben Becerra said the policy needs to be looked at.

“I was thinking that in those isolated unique moments, we should have something written down where the motion does not automatically put you in the chipper,” Becerra said.

The Hays County Commissioners Court meets on select Tuesdays at 9 a.m. each month. For more information visit its website.

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