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The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star




The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

Senior 30: Just a quick opinion

Senior+30+Photo%3A+McKenna+Bailey
Senior 30 Photo: McKenna Bailey

Writing is my life and breath. If I’m not writing, I’m not living. I’ve been giving my opinions at The Star about various things, from video gaming to summer classes, and I’ve enjoyed all the thought, time and effort into the words that each topic deserved.
Although my time here has been relatively short, and I’ve only actually been at Texas State for about two and a half years, I have genuinely loved my time here. It saddens me to leave, but I am excited about figuring out my next steps.
For this sign-off, I wanted to give a quick opinion or advice on imposter syndrome. For those of you who don’t know what imposter syndrome is, it’s when you feel underskilled or inadequate compared to others around you. You feel like an imposter, even if those around you will tell you how skilled or amazing you are. Many things have factored into my own imposter syndrome. One reason is being a woman in STEM, but the other reason has to do with my journey so far.
My journey has been unconventional by normal or average college student standards. After graduating high school, I went to Austin Community College and graduated in two years with my associate’s degree and transferred here to Texas State.
Unfortunately, I transferred right as the pandemic hit, so my first year here was completely online. Since I wasn’t on campus, I had no idea about The Star or KTSW 89.9 or other student organizations I didn’t join until my second year.
I do have to say that doing this has its ups and downs. Although I felt no pressure to graduate within exactly four years, or rather two years, and it was the right decision financially, not being at Texas State for long enough made it difficult to make deep connections and friendships. The friends I made lasted only semester by semester, unfortunately. I saw it as a sign that my other friendships outside of school were long-lasting ones.
Besides, there’s always graduate school, which just so happens to be my next step. I applied for graduate school at Texas State, but when I was denied, I again saw it as a sign. Although I love Texas, I’ll get to live in my dream place when I attend the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.
Throughout this time, struggling with imposter syndrome has taught me something I hope someone reading will be inspired by. Absolutely under no circumstances listen to the old adage that says “there is always someone better than you.” I grew up hearing that, as many of us might, but it’s a lie. Telling yourself that there is someone better out there does nothing but shrink your own idea of your abilities. Telling yourself the opposite, however, that you are unique and a master in your own right, will lead to turning heads and conquering fears. But that’s just my opinion.
Special thanks to Dillon for hiring me, to Bruce and Ashley for inspiring me to be a better writer, to my mom and my sister for the support and grace, and to my various friends and family for giving me their much-appreciated feedback and opinions on my opinions. Thank you a million times, and don’t forget that your opinion matters.

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