46° San Marcos
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The University Star




The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

On the road to no-kill status

San+Marcos+Animal+Shelter+on+Oct+3.

San Marcos Animal Shelter on Oct 3.

The City of San Marcos is moving a step closer to turning its animal shelter into a no-kill facility.
The San Marcos Regional Shelter has added a program coordinator, totaling two coordinators the shelter has hired. The job of the program coordinator is to aid in shelter initiatives like adoptions as well as foster-rescue volunteers. With the new position, the city is on track for its five-year plan of reaching no-kill status, meaning the SMRS would be at a 90% live outcome.
Additionally, SMRS received a shelter technician, one of the five initially asked for. A shelter technician is responsible for the maintenance and services of the shelter.
Neighborhood Enhancement Interim Director DerryAnn Krupinsky believes it will take more than one additional shelter technician to sustain the facility but understands it takes time to acquire the help needed.
“The five year plan to get 90% was a realistic forecast based on needing to get the right funding and people in place to do that and gain the space,” Krupinsky said.
Although San Marcos is harboring about 80% live outcome, animals are still being euthanized. Several animals were selected to be put down Oct. 9 to create room. When it comes to the process of becoming a no-kill shelter, staffing in San Marcos remains the predominant issue.
The shelter staff is currently searching for a new manager, which has not been filled since April 2019. The absence of a shelter manager is due to a lack of programs being initiated for shelter staff to acquire appropriate funding.
However, given the city’s population growth, SMRS is now receiving well-needed funds to staff the shelter.
Hays County Animal Advocates is a Facebook group created by Hays County residents to advocate for animal rights. When it comes to animals in the area, HCAA member Sharri Boyett wants the city to be involved as much as possible.
“Cities contract for animal services because it is a necessary function, like trash removal or street sweeping,” Boyett said. “It’s expensive, but this county is growing. With the growth of the county comes the growth of the problem, so we need a solution.”
Even though the shelter has San Marcos in its name, SMRS serves as the primary intake facility for Hays County. Strays or unwanted animals in Hays County go to SMRS. The facility staff constantly seeks volunteers and donations.
HCAA wants the Texas State community to become involved with the animal shelter as much as possible. Texas State students have taken notice.
Lessly Lopez, electronic media senior, said she noticed Facebook posts about animals in need of adoption.
“It would be great if someone could even foster because you are allowed to foster the animal for up to two days,” Lopez said. “Anything can help. I think people should get more involved. At least if you don’t adopt the animals, foster them.”
For more information about the San Marcos Regional Shelter, visit: http://sanmarcostx.gov/208/San-Marcos-Regional-Animal-Shelter

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