78° San Marcos
The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star




The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

Opinion: Music can help get you through midterms

Music+column+illustration
Music column illustration

Students should take time every day to listen to music because it can benefit study habits, mental and physical health.
Concentrating on schoolwork can be arduous. Long study sessions can lead to underlying causes such as stress, depression and anxiety. While it can yield different results for everyone, listening to music while studying has been shown to have multiple benefits.
According to Healthline, music can help promote a more positive mindset. Students are more likely to have better results when completing homework or reviewing test materials when in a good mood.
According to WebMD, pressure can improve the ability to create memories but also affect the ability to retrieve those memories. Listening to music has been shown to lower stress and enhance relaxation.
Bella Haltom, a business marketing freshman, implements the habit of listening to music in her study sessions.
“Even if it’s just instrumental music in the background, I always need something to listen to so that I’m not just focusing on the words that I’m reading,” Haltom said. “If I’m just trying to study without any distractions, I tend to study for shorter periods of time so listening to music helps me stay focused for longer periods of time.”
Music can activate both the left and right brain hemispheres at the same time, which aids in improving memory and maximizing the amount of information learned. In addition, instrumental music can be beneficial because, without the lyrics, there is less opportunity for distraction while also keeping the brain stimulated.
Music can also affect mental health significantly. According to The Jedd Foundation, the average teen spends two and a half hours daily listening to music. In addition, teens often listen to music to explore their identities and discover how they choose to fit in.
A person’s music taste tends to change along with their psychological and social needs. With a new allowance for freedom in college, students may stray away from the music they have listened to most of their lives. Though it may be small, it is a step toward independence and discovering oneself.
With pressure from both school and personal life mental health is present for students, it can be easy to get tunnel vision and slowly begin to isolate from others.
People with anxiety or depression can turn to specific solutions, such as music therapy, to lessen some effects. This therapy can include making music, listening to music and even dancing. It helps patients deal with stress, and it promotes psychological well-being.
Another way music can benefit mental health is through the community that comes with it. No matter what one listens to, there will always be someone else who is a fan. For students having trouble finding a place where they feel like they belong, connecting through music can be one of the most straightforward solutions. At Texas State, multiple organizations have a shared interest in music, such as Bobcat Country and Hip Hop Congress.
According to Greater Good Magazine, listening to music with others has been shown to impact neurochemicals in the brain that play a role in personal connections which explains why, at concerts, one feels happier or more excited than usual.
Experiencing at least 20 minutes of live music every two weeks can improve one’s self-perceived wellness by 20%. For Texas State students who want to test this, there are many local options for live music, such as Stellar Coffee Co., which hosts an open mic night every Thursday.
The effects of music go even further in impacting physical health. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, not many things in the world stimulate the brain the way music does. Because music has a complex structure, the brain must do a lot of computing to make sense of it. It provides a “workout” for the brain.
The most notable benefit is that music is proven to be heart-healthy. According to Harvard Medical School, the brainstem controls the rate of one’s heartbeat and respiration; it is also where sound processing begins. So, depending on the type of music being listened to, it can lower blood pressure, heart rate and breathing rate. Though the effect may be small, it is incredibly positive.
Music can even have positive benefits during physical activity. For example, listening to music while working out can increase stamina and improve one’s mood. In addition, faster-paced music can be beneficial for increasing distance and pace when completing specific exercises. Music can also boost serotonin levels and be a minor distraction from the workout.
It is clear that music has many benefits, but it is essential to remember that every good thing has downfalls. Listening to music through headphones frequently can lead to hearing loss over time. It can also be a distraction when focusing on essential tasks, especially when learning new material. It can be an auditory distraction and take away focus at inconvenient times. Music is sometimes better implemented in moderation.
That said, take the time to listen to your favorite song today because it might make you feel better and focus.
– Rhian Davis is a journalism freshman
The University Star welcomes Letters to the Editor from its readers. All submissions are reviewed and considered by the Editor-in-Chief and Opinions Editor for publication. Not all letters are guaranteed for publication.

Donate to The University Star

Your donation will support the student journalists of Texas State University. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The University Star