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The University Star




The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

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Jewish Bobcats at Texas State react to anti-Semitic flyers on campus

After anti-Semitic and white supremacy flyers were posted on campus, the Jewish Bobcats at Texas State have mixed reactions in response to the hateful climate.
The flyers were posted between Oct. 16 and 17, calling for “global white supremacy” in America and encouraging students to go to a website about the principles of “blood and soil”. According to an article written by Scott Simon for the National Public Radio, “blood and soil” can be linked back to Nazi Germany and its views on the Jewish community.
Dakota Redmond, elementary education junior, said she was surprised upon hearing about the flyers and always thought people at Texas State were accepting and open-minded.
Redmond immediately called her mother crying and the rest of her family was just as upset after hearing the news.
Redmond said she feels less welcome on campus as a member of Jewish Bobcats after realizing there may be a certain group that does not want her on campus.
“Knowing that there are people on campus that feel that way about the Jewish community,” Redmond said. “I definitely feel like there are people here that don’t want me here,”
However, Redmond said she does not find it hard to trust people on campus. She still feels accepted by the people around her but is not sure how she would feel if she were majoring in a different field.
Justin Wright, English senior, said responses to the flyers from the campus community and university officials has actually made him feel even more welcome on campus.
“Rather than encouraging more flyers to be put up to segregate us as Jewish people, the responses have been very positive, in regard to making sure that we do feel welcome, that we feel safe,” Wright said.
Although unsurprised, Wright said he was confused as to why the flyers were posted in the first place and wanted to know what the motivation was to post such hateful content on such a progressive campus.
Daniel Espindola, industrial engineering senior and Vice President of Jewish Bobcats, said he feels like people can still be trusted on campus. He continues to wear his Star of David necklace every day to show he is proud of his faith.
“We’re not hiding, we’re not running away,” Espindola said. “It’s good to know what’s going on and be aware.”
President Denise Trauth sent out a statement Oct. 17 condemning the flyers. She let students and faculty know this hateful rhetoric does not define Texas State and will not be tolerated.
All three students had different reactions to the flyers, but the consensus is that these events will not change how they feel about their faith and heritage.
“We won’t be scared and we won’t be moved,” Wright said.

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