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The University Star




The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

Students prepare to showcase hard work and creativity at spring fashion show

Texas State fashion merchandising junior Niko Guzman (left) and applied mathematics senior Audrey Larson model for Rolling Stoned Goods by Rachel Roosth, Wednesday, April 6, 2022, at Devils Backbone Tavern.

Texas State fashion merchandising junior Niko Guzman (left) and applied mathematics senior Audrey Larson model for Rolling Stoned Goods by Rachel Roosth, Wednesday, April 6, 2022, at Devil’s Backbone Tavern.

Students in the Fashion Merchandising Association (FMA) are sewing final stitches, touching up hair and makeup and making final photo shoot edits as they prepare to get their glam on at the spring 2022 fashion show on April 30.
For over five years, FMA has been putting on biannual fashion shows for fashion-loving students at Texas State. From the head coordinator, videographers and photographers to the glam squad, models and designers, more than 80 students participating in this semester’s show have been working hard since January to bring their creations to the runway.
Fashion Show Coordinator Natalie Ryan, a photography senior, has been working hard to plan the spring show by securing the venue, booking catering, coordinating photo shoot schedules and accepting applications to be a part of the show. This is her second semester being the fashion show coordinator and although the work has been stressful, she has loved every moment of it.
“I just like working with so many different people that I never would have met if it hadn’t been for the show. [I’ve met] so many awesome models, so many really cool photographers, and makeup people and stylists and designers. I just love seeing handmade clothes. I love seeing what they come up with every semester because it’s so different,” Ryan said. “I just love that everything is by students. It’s all student-run. It’s so cool to see.”
Ryan started out as a photographer for last spring’s fashion show. It was then that she became interested in running the show for the rest of her time at Texas State. Since becoming the head coordinator, she has incorporated new aspects into the show’s process like photo shoots that designers and models can use as memorabilia or portfolio material, as well as the videos that are played during the show.
As she also prepares for her graduation in May, Ryan said she is sad that this fashion show will be her last one.
“It is so bittersweet. I love the fashion show so much and I’m really sad. It’s gonna be my last one, but it makes me want to make this like the best one,” Ryan said.
This semester’s designers will utilize their own unique styles and techniques to fill the runway with fun, summery and bright colors. Some of the clothing that will be featured include crocheted, thrifted, upcycled and handmade pieces.
Lucy Pietsch, a fashion merchandising senior and one of the show’s designers, will have five upcycled pieces on the runway and will also be selling some of her own clothes and previous creations from her Depop shop, LKPDESIGN.
Pietsch was always interested in fashion but got more involved in high school after competing in competitions for Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), a nonprofit Career and Technical Student Organization (CTSO) for middle and high school students enrolled in family and consumer sciences courses.
Pietsch recycled, redesigned and created clothing out of paper plates and soda box containers, inspiring her love for sustainable fashion. For the fashion show, inspired by childhood toys like Polly Pockets, she wanted to make pieces based on colors she hasn’t used before from thrifted fabric or clothes she already owned.
“I like expressing my creativity [while] also doing something that’s like sustainable related [since] I’ve always been into a lot of sustainability stuff,” Pietsch said. It was just fun getting to do this in college because I remember freshman year and my sophomore year, I was in FMA but I just never really had the courage to actually do a collection because I was like, ‘I can’t do that. I [hot glue] dresses and like [staple] stuff,’ But then I just was like, ‘I’m just gonna do it,’ and I did it.”
After she graduates, Pietsch plans to continue pursuing a career in the fashion industry by interning with Nordstrom in Seattle.
In addition to unique student designs and outfit creations that will be on sale on Saturday, retail shops such as Pitaya and a student-run pop-up shop called Big Kid Vintage will display their merchandise at the show.
Big Kid Vintage was created by Sean Lukic, a manufacturing engineer freshman, and his brother in 2018. They began thrifting in 2010 as a means to save money rather than a way to be trendy. Since opening his business, Lukic said the business has helped his family and he enjoys being able to make and spend his own money.
“I didn’t expect it to turn until what it has. I didn’t expect it to make the impact it’s made on me. For me, it was always just like something that was there,” Lukic said. “But then I realized, unknowingly, [that it] relieved a burden from my parents because…we were able to earn this money it’s like one less thing that you have to worry about.”
Lukic and his brother started thrifting and selling their clothes on eBay and Poshmark and have since done several pop-up shops around Austin. Big Kid Vintage’s collection consists of vintage clothes for men and women with styles ranging from the 1960s to the early 2000s. At the show, Lukic will have over 75 items for sale.
Meeting new people and creating an inclusive market for all shapes and sizes to help others look their best has kept Lukic and his brother inspired to keep growing their small business.
Lukic’s peer mentor, who is in FMA, is the one who suggested he apply for Big Kid Vintage to be a retailer at the fashion show. Lukic has enjoyed seeing the work and creativity that goes into putting the show together and is excited to meet more people who share his love for clothing.
“I just really like being around creative people. I feel like I’ve only done half of everything that’s gonna happen,” Lukic said. “I’m really excited about the show. I feel like I’m going to be able to meet more Texas State people, more people are going to be able to know about like, my personal interest.”
The fashion show will take place from 6-9 p.m. in the LBJ Ballroom on April 30. Tickets are on sale until the day of the show. General admission tickets are $15 and VIP tickets are $20 and include VIP seating and a tote bag with FMA merchandise and other goodies.
To purchase tickets to the fashion show, visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ss22-fma-fashion-show-tickets-313137401397.
Editor’s Note: Natalie Ryan is also a member of The University Star.

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