77° San Marcos
The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star




The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The State of the Uterus: a party for fundamental rights

Photo+by+Bayley+Bogus.
Photo by Bayley Bogus.

By Bayley Bogus
AUSTIN, Texas —The second annual State of the Uterus took place at Cheer Up Charlie’s on Jan. 26.
This annual party is to raise money for nonprofit organizations invested in reproductive health, menstrual health and community health. It is produced by the #bossbabesATX, who strive to connect self-identifying women through events, showcases and programs.
Jane Claire Hervey, founder and executive director of #bossbabesATX, explained the founding of the organization.
“We (the founding board members) all grew up in very small towns where the constituents were largely voting for Trump, so we weren’t really under the impression that Hillary Clinton was going to win,” Hervey said. “So, we funneled our energy into the first State of the Uterus in 2017, claiming that it was our State of the Union.”
The first annual State of the Uterus raised over $6800. This year, the goal was to raise at least $8000, with the hope each organization could walk away with $1500 or more, said Hervey. Tickets were five dollars for attendees, and the money was split evenly between all five benefiting nonprofits, which include Community Restoration Project by Counter Balance: ATX, Planned Parenthood of Greater Texas, Survive2Thrive Foundation, Homeless Period Project ATX and #bossbabesATX.
Courtney Santana, CEO and founder of Survive2Thrive, a foundation that aids victims of domestic violence, said her organization is there to fight.
“We need changes to support men, women and children,” Santana  said.
The event featured performances by Dj Kay Cali, GirlFriend ATX and Chulita Vinyl Club, and hosted speakers from different nonrofits that were present. There was a “resistance market” set up with booths from female-inspired businesses such as The F Word Gift Shop, The Wednesdays Art, Peach Fuzz Magazine and more. Guests could also take part in several activities while listening to speakers, like a community saging, Zine-making with Book Woman, period-kit packing and tarot card reading.
Mikhaela Locklear, a 23-year-old attendee, attended the event last year as well as this years. Locklear said she feels empowered by the event.
“I came (to this event) last year after the inauguration and it was just such an empowering event for women,” Locklear said. “I got to just dance on a table and forget all the bad things that were going on and just realized how much of a support system women who believe in the same things you do can be.”
According to Hervey, that was the whole goal. While the event took months to plan and a village of people to produce it for a little payoff of about $8000, the State of the Uterus is about more than fundraising.
“We wanted to create a space where we could all party together and celebrate one another’s accomplishments for gender equality, women’s health and empathy in the face of a hostile political climate,” Hervey said. “It’s obviously insane and a lot of work, but it’s so worth it.”

Donate to The University Star

Your donation will support the student journalists of Texas State University. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The University Star