71° San Marcos
The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star




The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

The Student News Site of Texas State University

The University Star

San Marcos remains a safe place to live

There has been an increase in crime reports within the past year, creating concern in the community about whether San Marcos is still safe. However, believing safety is ever fully guaranteed is ignorant. The simple act of driving a car is the most dangerous activity a human being performs, yet thousands of people drive every day. San Marcos is still relatively safe.
The City of San Marcos is inhabited by over 63,000 residents. The population has continuously grown year after year and does not seem to be stopping or slowing anytime soon. The current freshman class broke records and became the largest group of students Texas State has ever received. The students who choose San Marcos as their new home did so with the impression it was a safe and dependable city to live in; they were not wrong.
Earlier this year, there were five homicides reported, devastating the San Marcos community. People can never really anticipate danger unless, of course, it is foreseen. Society can only be prepared for what could come. However, to question the safety within the city because of such acts is premature. The majority of the homicide cases were interpersonal; the victim and the attacker knew each other in some way.
Although crime rates in the area have seen a spike, the question of safety in San Marcos should not be of concern. Safety should be questioned when acts of unmotivated evil and chaos are committed continuously. This is not to say San Marcos does not experience its fair share of crime, but no one should panic over high-profile, news-making crimes; this is inevitable anywhere, as long as people have media access.
The chances of falling victim to violent crime in San Marcos is 1 in 284 in comparison to the state of Texas, which is 1 in 228. Ironically, as crime increases, so do security and resources. In fact, The San Marcos Police Department is generously staffed with 158 full-time law enforcement employees and has taken serious action as the state of the city evolves. The current SMPD staff is the largest it has ever been.
After several rape incidents were reported last semester, the city police worked to find the suspect quickly and efficiently. Law enforcement officials were constantly releasing updates and sketches to keep the community informed.
Additionally, Texas State provides several outlets for students to feel safer while on campus. Emergency call boxes are located around campus to directly connect students to UPD once the blue button is pressed. TXState Alertssystem was created so students receive a text when there is an emergency in the city or on campus. Resources are limitless when it comes to student safety.
San Marcos is not unsafe, but the reality is crime is inevitable. Sociologist Emile Durkheim theorizes crime is necessary because it affirms social boundaries and pushes society toward necessary evolution. A high crime rate is concerning and unwanted, but again, crime is unavoidable in any decently sized city.
No real solution exists to prevent the slight paranoia felt when pumping gas at the convenience store on the corner or the inclination to double-check dead bolts are locked on the front door before going to bed. However, this is likely due to the negativity bias, where bad things are amplified and the good is ignored so it seems like crime happens around the clock. However, this is human nature and does not reflect reality.
San Marcos is nearly in the middle of Austin and San Antonio, so it is a busy, ever-growing city acclimating to what soon could be overpopulation. Understandably, the concern for safety will continue to be in conversation as crime reports further increase and become publicized.
San Marcos remains a safe and reliable place to build a family, pursue a college education or float the river. The community and student body should work together to keep the charisma of the city alive, not promote negativity and diminish its charm.

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