Stop being afraid to define the relationship

Photo+credit%3A+Rebecca+Harrell
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Stop being afraid to define the relationship

Photo credit: Rebecca Harrell

Photo credit: Rebecca Harrell

Photo credit: Rebecca Harrell

Photo credit: Rebecca Harrell

Amira Van Leeuwen

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Society has developed a fear of defining a relationship and that needs to be addressed. Dating is a thing of the past. Now all that matters is the online relationships you make before you meet someone.

The idea of dating can fluctuate in meaning across different cultures and people. As college students tread across campus, they may hear hushed phone calls and conversations relaying stories of someone’s latest hookup adventure. To campus communities, this is the definition of dating; what a tragedy.

In the 1950s, dating was straight to the point. Men courted women and pursued them until they developed a relationship. Back then dating was a process that exhibited mutual respect and loyalty. Impatience and selfish needs are clouding the minds of this generation and making it impossible for them to commit to anything real.

As one dives into the complexity of what it truly means to date someone the results are always unclear. However, the answer to dating in America often leads to joining hook-up apps like Tinder, Bumble or Grindr.

Despite the fast gaining popularity of these apps, it has become increasingly more difficult to establish a human connection. Dating apps are rarely used for their designed purpose— to meet someone, go out on a date and find love. Instead, these apps are primarily used as a loophole to hookup.

Although the attitude surrounding online dating has grown more positive in recent years, the digital realm is a broad universe where young adults meet, date and break-up with romantic partners months, sometimes weeks, at a time. Advancing technology is one benefactor contributing to the disappearance of classic dating. There is no longer an incentive to go out and meet someone new.

Instead, a person is more likely to find their next one night stand or short-lived relationship based on looks, a Spotify link and a short biography that includes a lame, sexually charged pick-up line.

College students no longer have an interest in meeting someone new and getting to know them. The terms and conditions one must agree to in order to be considered dateable predominately revolve around sex. In fact, sex is often expected upfront when hanging out for the first few times.

After this event occurs a person is usually left wandering in a purgatory realm of a relationship. Questions arise between those who are involved which leads to the common conclusion that they are just not ready to date. Pride and ignorance aid the disillusionment of a real commitment. Thus, the vicious cycle of virtual dating continues.

College students need to understand there is more to a healthy relationship than the hook-up culture everyone seems to have adopted. Dating requires more than a simple swipe or super like. People should be able to go on dates without feeling pressured to adhere to the backward thinking dating poses today.

The trend of not defining a relationship must come to an end.

– Amira Van Leeuwen is a journalism and mass communication sophomore

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