Buda Wiener Dog Races help raise money for children living with disabilities

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Buda Wiener Dog Races help raise money for children living with disabilities


Five wiener dogs compete in the second set of races in the day.



Photo by Laura Figi

Five wiener dogs compete in the second set of races in the day.
Photo by Laura Figi

Five wiener dogs compete in the second set of races in the day.
Photo by Laura Figi

Five wiener dogs compete in the second set of races in the day.
Photo by Laura Figi

Laura Figi

The Buda Wiener Dog Races is one of the biggest sausage fests in Texas. People nationwide visit to showcase their dachshunds and compete in light-hearted races, while enjoying other competitions, fair food and flea market-style shopping.

The event took place from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., April 20-21, at Buck’s Backyard in Buda. The 22nd annual event featured a country fair, live music and various activities for all ages. Admission was $5 and free for children under 12.

The 2019 theme was “Game of Wieners” after the popular HBO show “Game of Thrones.” The event has been a long-standing tradition for Buda Lions Club, an organization that raises money for various areas in the community and oftentimes children living with disabilities.

There were several charities raising money at the event, including Relay for Life and the Jakku Temple Saber Guild, a not-for-profit Star Wars lightsaber performance group.

The local director for the Jakku Temple Saber Guild, Heather Trupia, said the group started attending the Wiener Dog Races a few years ago for the Star Wars theme, but has returned every year since.

“Our mission is just to come alongside communities and charities and make the galaxy a little brighter and help other people,” Trupia said.

The Jakku Temple Saber Guild often works with the Texas Lions Camp, which the Buda Wiener Dog Races help fund. The camp provides unique experiences for children living with disabilities such as archery, music, horseback riding and canoeing.

The camp has an application process that opens in January, but if the child is admitted, they attend the camp for free. The only qualification is the child must have a qualifying physical disability.

Texas State’s own Chi Beta Delta participated in Relay for Life and is currently part of the top performing team.

Relay for Life volunteer Rebecca Chapa said any form or amount of donation helps the organization.

“I think this is a great opportunity for so many different organizations to be able to come together and hopefully make connections that will help support each other,” Chapa said.

Attendees and participants may bring all types of dogs to the event, not just dachshunds. There is a competition that allows all breeds to compete titled, “How Fast is Your Dog???” in which dogs race one at a time and are judged on how many miles per hour they can run.

Lori Alcantar, winner of the “How Fast is Your Dog???” contest, heard about the competition in 2018 but had left her dog, Roxy, at home. This year was Roxy’s first time competing and she won first place at 27 mph.

“She’s a car chaser; she practices every day,” Alcantar said. “(My favorite part of the races) is that I’m able to bring all my dogs and we’re able to come as a family with them, because they are part of our family.”

For more information on the Buda Wiener Dog Races, visit budalions.com. For more information on the Texas Lions Camp, visit lionscamp.com

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